Active


Collaborative Research: The impacts of the distribution of phenotypic effects and the distribution of pleiotropiccosts on the genetics of natural adaptations

Overview: Defining the evolutionary and genetic mechanisms dictating how organisms genetically respond to environmental challenges is critical for describing, explaining, and predicting the course of evolution. Despite much work, we still do not know which types of genes—if any—disproportionately contribute to adaptations. The pleiotropic cost of substituting an adaptive allele may predict which genes are more likely to successfully contribute to an adaptation. However, highly pleiotropic genes, due to their highly connected nature, may be better able to produce with alleles of large phenotypic effect. If large evolutionary jumps are needed, these alleles may enable populations to better to respond to major challenges. The proposed project tests these ideas by surveying changes in the gene content, morphology, and expression patterns of key developmental genes in the chemosensory system. This project looks at how components of this network and chemosensory receptor content change across phylogenetically related species, particularly those with recent dietary shifts (e.g. herbivores à fungivores). These data will show which genetic changes are the initial steps in these adaptations and how often low pleiotropy genes vs high pleiotropy genes contribute to adaptation.

National Science Foundation (NSF)

5/1/15 → 4/30/19


Meiotic Recombination in Drosophila

Overview: Crossovers direct the accurate segregation of meiotic chromosomes. Several decades of effort has led to a detailed model outlining the mechanism of meiotic recombination. This is based almost entirely on research done with a single model organism, the budding yeast S. cerevisiae. We recently tested key features of this model in the metazoan Drosophila melanogaster. To do this, we knocked out both canonical (long-patch) and short-patch mismatch repair, the first time this has been done in a metazoan. Our results suggested a new model, one that has some fundamental differences from the model developed through fungal research.

NIH National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

5/1/00 → 6/30/18

 

Finished


Nanofluidic Platforms for High Resolution Mapping of Genomic DNA

Overview

NIH National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)

9/1/13 → 7/31/17


Development of novel methods to exploit next gen sequencing for HIV

Overview

NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

8/1/13 → 7/31/15


Developing REA (Repetitive element Assembler) algorithm for assembling repetitive and hyper-variable geneomic regions

Overview

North Carolina Biotechnology Center (NCBC)

7/1/13 → 12/31/15


CC-NIE Network Infrastructure: Enabling data-driven research

Overview

National Science Foundation (NSF)

12/1/12 → 11/30/15


Unlocking transcript diversity via differential analyses of splice graphs

Overview

NIH National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)

5/23/12 → 3/31/16


Fitness cost of horizontal gene transfer to Pseudomonas syringae

Overview

Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society

5/1/12 → 4/30/13


CTSA Core Consolidation Supplement

Overview

NIH National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)

8/5/10 → 8/4/11


Viral Adaptation to Host Selenium Status

Overview

NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

4/1/10 → 3/31/14